Getting Kids Gardening

Getting Kids Gardening

Kids are naturally drawn to getting their fingers into the dirt and investigating the plants growing in their own backyards. Encouraging children to grow their own plants from seeds in home or school gardens taps into that natural inclination and gives the opportunity to teach little ones about biology and ecology. Studies have even found that gardening at a young age can help children build social skills, promote healthy eating habits and foster positive attitudes toward science throughout life.

 

Getting kids gardening is easy but getting them out, we can't make any promises.

Getting kids gardening is easy but getting them out, we can’t make any promises.

 

The benefits of gardening are truly undeniable, and that’s why WindowBox.com is so pleased to partner with KidsGardening.org to help bring gardening programs to kids across the country.

 

Getting Kids Gardening

 

KidsGardening.org is one of the best gardening websites geared toward kids on the Internet. The site is packed with lesson plans that teachers can use to bring gardening into the classroom to support many different types of lessons. In addition, the website has family garden activity ideas for parents to share with their children. Articles on topics related to indoor and outdoor gardening are posted regularly to help families and school classes get the best results with their kids gardening projects. The site is one of many projects funded by The National Gardening Association.

 

Teaching kids the importance of gardening is just as important as teaching them about healthy diets.

Teaching kids the importance of gardening is just as important as teaching them about healthy diets.

 

 

The National Gardening Program

 

Every year, The National Gardening Association offers a wide variety of grants through KidsGardening.org. Since the inception of their youth gardening program in 1982, the association has granted more than 10,000 awards, giving out grants of more than $4 million that funded educational, fun gardening projects for more than 2 million children. The grants are provided to community groups and schools with different programs accepting applications throughout the year. If you want to learn more about grants for schools currently being offered at KidsGardening.org, you can get more information at their website.

 

2015 Youth Garden Grant Winners

 

One of the most well-known programs sponsored by The National Gardening Association is the Youth Garden Grant, which provides awards to 20 different schools and communities that are currently gardening or plan to launch gardening projects in the near future. WindowBox.com was proud to be one of the official sponsors of the 2015 Youth Garden Grant Program, which received more than 1,000 applications. The 20 winning groups and schools received a $500 gift certificate to the Gardening with Kids store, a set of tools and our Micro-greens Grow Box – Spices and Micro-greens Grow Box – Veggies sets. We are thrilled to have been a part of the program and would like to congratulate all of the winners and wish them the greenest of growing results.

 

Getting kids gardening with micro-greens grow kits!

Getting kids gardening with micro-greens grow kits!

 

Looking for easy garden ideas that you can use to teach your child more about the plants that surround them? We have a number of container gardening sets made especially with children in mind. These sets include the grow boxes, seeds and other essentials needed to start container gardens indoors. Check them out here and find something fun to inspire a lifelong love of gardening in your child.

1 reply
  1. Olivia Foster
    Olivia Foster says:

    My daughter loves playing in the dirt and planting is very interesting for her. We started our garden with few flowers, because Dawn wanted to “make our backyard more beautiful”. Then the next year we added vegetable plants and this year we made a cute herb garden. She loves gardening and she sees it more like a game, not work, and I think this brings great positives for her development as a person. Greets!

    Reply

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