Curb appeal is just minutes away with this easy DIY guide from our experts!

Installing Window Boxes on Vinyl Siding

Got vinyl siding? Then you’ve come to the right place for learning how to hang a window box planter on your home exterior. Easy, affordable and versatile, container gardening is definitely one of our favorite DIY tips for increasing curb appeal. Ah, we can smell the budding floral arrangements now… But before the potting can begin there are flower boxes to be installed. Determining the best way to hang window boxes on vinyl siding comes down to preference. Whichever method you choose, remember to keep the overall estimated weight of your finished flower arrangements in mind. This may help to guide you toward the goal of improving curb appeal for ranch homes, bungalows and two-story colonials. In our experience, there’s really two choices for installation: Number 1: The Direct Mount Route Number 2: The Mounting Hook Route It’s important to remember that the window box you purchase may come with mounting hardware. In this case, we would err on the side of what the manufacturer suggests. Having said that, our preference for hanging window planters definitely takes us down Path Number 1. The Direct Mount Route Straightforward and sturdy for a smooth ride to curb appeal town:

  • Good stability makes for a lasting installation
  • Superior weight bearing potential – more soil, more flowers, max beauty
  • Seamless post-mount look; no gaps between the flower box and siding
  • More secure than mounting hooks for lowest detachment risk
Curb appeal is just minutes away with this easy DIY guide from our experts!

Curb appeal is just minutes away with this easy DIY guide from our experts!

Supply List:

  • Window box with proper dimensions
  • Stud finder
  • Wood pencil or marker
  • Mounting bolts
  • Power drill (recommended); or screwdriver

How To Install:

  • Locate studs. When hanging a window box on vinyl siding, the wooden studs hidden beneath serve as the true mounting surface. You’ll drill holes all the way through to nestle bolts in these wood planks.
  • Determine flower box proportions. Most containers have pre-drilled mounting holes or built-in brackets. Find these and measure the distance between them to see if it lines up with studs.

For Windowbox.com customers,most of our metal flower planter cages, wood flower boxes and composite PVC styles will align with standard 16″-18″ stud spacing.

  • Mark spots for drilling. According to window box measurements, clearly mark where in the vinyl your holes should be drilled.
  • Drill place holders. To ensure the screw goes in straight, use your drill to make shallow starter holes. Just to make sure screws are guided in the right direction.
  • Screw in bolt number one. You’ll be threading hardware through the container’s mounting tab. Begin only with one, on either side or a center tab, depending on where brackets or holes are located.
  • Fasten the flower box. With the entire weight of the container supported, use your power drill until the first screw reaches a wood stud. Don’t tighten fully, though. A little wiggle room is still needed to ensure the other bolts screw in straight.

Safety note:If unable to support the planter box while drilling, make sure you have a helper during this part of the process.

  • Repeat step #7. With the rest of the mounting holes until each end is secure. Then, using your eye or a level, verify window boxes are straight. Finally, finish by tightening all the bolts fully.
  • Enjoy! Season after season of gorgeous container gardening, knowing you have the best hanging window planters for the job.

Standard stud spacing is usually 16-18″ – so our window boxes are perfect, since you’re able to place hardware wherever you like in most cases (all metal cages + PVC boxes + wood boxes)

  • Can nail or screw directly into vinyl siding, simply locate the wooden stud behind it
  • 1/4″ or 3/8″ diameter bolts
  • Other homeowners prefer to use hook hangers designed to mount things along vinyl siding
  • Vinyl siding introduced in the 1960’s; since, has become #1 siding choice because of low cost, versatility, durability, low-maintenance requirements and diverse color choices
  • Can be found on most any style of home
  • Come in horizontal and vertical panels
  • Sometimes panels have other materials on them like shingles and shakes; textile designs like beaded motifs
1 reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *